"Saving a Life, One Girl at a Time!"
Who Is "Mother's Go Get Your Daughter's?"

We are a non-profit organization established to assist in safeguarding our daughters of all ethnic and age groups as well as walks of life.  We purpose to empower and assist those who are in need of support and/or striving to live a holistic life.  As a group of professional women we have come together to help in the communities in which we live to eliminate the criminal acts of human sex trafficking/exploitation, prostitution, arranged marriages, as well as those who are faced with a number of unsettling conditions.  We work together with all Law Enforcement entities to ensure all victims and survivors freedom and safety to the best of our ability.  

We schedule venues in Churches and Schools as well as community events providing the residents with information which is presented by a representative of the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI).  We distribute informational material throughout the communities in which we live to help bring awareness.  The material is placed in corner stores, hospitals, gas stations, hotels, fast food restuarants to say the least.  We also provide a 24 hour help line number (609-781-2026).
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The fear and abuse impressed on a number of prostitutes/traffic victims leaves them
incapable of navigating the world on their own, which is why facilities
who are partners with "Mother's Go Get Your Daughter's" are essential to their recovery.  "Mother's Go Get Your Daughter's"  was established to provide a strong support system for their recovery to be a success!

Help Us Help Them!

Undoing the Damage Caused by Sexual Crime.

Assisting in the Recovery!

Shelters are likely the strongest necessity that recovering prostitutes need, and those who require them usually do so in desperation. Unlike an addiction treatment center, a prostitution recovery center focuses on recovery from trauma and adversity. Prostitution can result in a very volatile way of life for many people. Some circumstances can even lead to mortal danger.

The line of work that prostitutes are in lead to many encounters with shady people and individuals living on the fringe of society. Customers, managers, pimps and other people from their circle can be a very rough group of people who have little to no respect for prostitutes and may severely mistreat them. The fear and abuse impressed on a number of prostitutes leaves them incapable of navigating the world on their own, which is why shelters are essential to their recovery.


I often ask women who I encounter working on the streets that if you had a choice to do it all over again would you choose this line of work.  Many have replied and said, "this was the only choice I had to feed my children as well as myself."  One of the women shared that often beaten and sexually violated just about everyday by a man who claimed to love her (which was her biological father).  Provoked her decision to run away to the streets.

Prostitutes work in their industry for a variety of reasons. Some people who work as prostitutes want to be in their industry and some do not. We certainly recognizes that not all prostitutes are victims, and many choose the life of a prostitute for sound economic reasons or as an expression of their sexual identity.

However, it has also been observed and studied that prostitution does commonly have damaging effects on prostitutes. Not in every case, but on the whole, prostitutes are more likely to suffer physical, mental and circumstantial hardships due to their profession than other professionals.

Physically, prostitutes are more susceptible to disease and violence than other professionals. Disease, of course, is often in the form of sexually transmitted disease, but can also be any other transmittable disease that is acquired through close proximity to a diseased person. Prostitutes are also at a higher risk of being the victims of violent crimes. Police forces statistically are less able to defend prostitutes than other citizens because of the shady, intimate situations they end up in.

In the picture above I sat down on the corner of Broadway & Spruce in Camden, New Jersey where I purposely encountered several women who sold their bodies to fund their Heroin addiction. Fortunately we were able to persuade them to go into a detox center in Philadelphia.  These were extremely educated and professionals who got caught up in a life of sex and drugs.
According to non-governmental U.S. sources;

Average victims age is 11 to 14
Approx 80% are women and children bought, sold and imprisoned in the underground sex service industry
Average life span of a victim is reported to be 7 years (found dead from attack, abuse, HIV and other STD's, malnutrition, overdose or suicide).

The largest group of at-risk children are runaway, thrown away, or homeless American children who use survival sex to acquire food, shelter, clothing, and other things needed to survive on America's streets. According to the National Runaway Switchboard  1.3 million runaway and homeless youth live on America's streets every day. [5,000 die each year] It would not be surprising to learn that the number of children trafficked in the United States is actually much higher than 300,000.

Children are often targeted by traffickers as they are deemed easier to manipulate than adults. More money can be earned by younger girls and boys exploited in sexual exploitation, especially virgins. Pre-pubescent girls are reported to be injected with hormones to bring on puberty. Younger girls are expected to have a greater earning potential, and as such are in greater demand. 

Sex buyers are far more complicit in the victimization of sex trafficking victims.

Sex tourism and child pornography have become worldwide industries, facilitated by technologies such as the Internet, which vastly expand the choices available to pedophiles and permit instant and nearly undetectable transactions. Sex buyers are far more complicit in the victimization of sex trafficking victims.

Sex tourism and child pornography have become worldwide industries, facilitated by technologies such as the Internet, which vastly expand the choices available to pedophiles and permit instant and nearly undetectable transactions.Sex buyers are far more complicit in the victimization of sex trafficking victims.

Sex tourism and child pornography have become worldwide industries, facilitated by technologies such as the Internet, which vastly expand the choices available to pedophiles and permit instant and nearly undetectable transactions.
"Saving a Life, One Girl at a Time!"
There’s No Such Thing as a Child Prostitute
By Cindy McCain and Malika Saada Saar


Across the United States, there are markets for sex with children that are not terribly dissimilar to ones in Cambodia, Thailand, and India. Girls are sold for sex in this country with the same disregard for human dignity as those other nations, and they are often tortured in the same ways when they try to escape.

According to the FBI, there are currently an estimated 293,000 American children at risk of being exploited and trafficked for sex. The majority of them are girls between the ages of 12 and 14. These are middle school girls who should be focused on history and math class and playing soccer with friends.

Instead, they are abducted or lured by traffickers and, once in the commercial sex trade, they are routinely raped, beaten into submission, and sometimes even branded. Yes, they are literally branded like cattle, sometimes on their faces. If they build up the courage to try to run away, the traffickers torture or gang rape them. Often, they do both.

These are girls like Jackie, who ran away from an abusive home at 13 only to be found alone and hungry by a trafficker who promised to love her like a father, a boyfriend or Prince Charming. He was nothing of the sort. He sold her to at least six different men every night. When she begged him for food or rest, he beat her.

Unfortunately, in the media, law, and policy, Jackie and other trafficked and exploited girls in the United States are not treated as victims of child rape and sexual violence. They are instead considered delinquents and arrested as “child prostitutes.” More than 1,000 children every year are arrested for prostitution, even though most of these children are not of the legal age to consent to sex at all, let alone commercial sex.

Describing trafficked and exploited children as prostitutes is a contradiction in terms. “Child prostitute” suggests consent or agency, when, in this case, there really is none. Moreover, the term “child prostitute” has the effect of dismissing the victimization and abuse that has been committed against the child, and makes it somehow different or more tolerable from other forms of rape or sexual abuse of minors.

Simply put, there is no difference between raping a child, and paying to rape a child.

That is why the Human Rights Project for Girls (Rights4Girls) and The McCain Institute, with support from Google, are joining forces to launch the No Such Thing campaign with one mission: To make clear to the American people that there is no such thing as a child prostitute. There are only victims and survivors of child rape.

Girls who are repeatedly raped, abused and exploited are not child prostitutes. They are victims and survivors of child rape, and they deserve all the legal protections, support, and services afforded to other victims of the same kind of abuse.
This weekend is the Super Bowl. Large sporting and entertainment events have a reputation of attracting illicit behavior as well as loyal fans to host cities. This year, and in the year ahead, let’s make it clear that girls who are being bought and sold for sex are not “child prostitutes”, they are victims and survivors of child rape.

Language matters. How we are labeled affects how we are treated. Each of us can ensure that the language used, in the media, in policy, and in the public square, gives truth and dignity to what trafficked girls endure.

This post is part of a series produced by The Huffington Post and Rights4Girls in conjunction with The McCain Institute. Join us in our campaign No Such Thing—that there is no such thing as child prostitute, only victims and survivors or child rape. For more information on No SuchThing, follow Malika Saada Saar on Twitter: www.twitter.com/malikasaadasaar
ABOUT US
Mother's Go Get Your Daughter's is an outreach program designed to empower while working in collaboration with other organizations in order to promote human development.  These services may include, but are not limited to substance abuse and mental health counseling, parenting skills, gang abatement training and employment readiness training.  We assist with relocation and find placement for victims who are in need of a safe and secure place to live.
Mother's Go Get Your Daughter's is a Female Mentoring Program which was established in 2012. We exist to encourage, equip, promote and challenge women as well as young girls to maximize their full potential.  In short, our Program is an outreach designed to empower and assist those who are in need of support and/or striving to live a holistic life.
WHAT WE DO
OUR HISTORY
WHO WE ARE
As an organization of business and professional women working to improve the lives of women and girls in local communities throughtout the state. We undertake a number of projects that directly and indirectly help potential trafficking victims.  In late 2012, the organization launched a major campaign aimed at raising awareness about the devastating practice of sex trafficking.  We placed cards and trifolds about trafficking in highly visible locations including police stations, women's centers, hospitals, legal aid societies,etc.,.  In addition, the organization is calling on the public to do its part to end this hedious practice.
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